TINT Title TINT Title
An Uncritical Inference Test
Based on the work of William V. Haney

Carefully read the brief story which follows. Assume that all of the information presented in the story is definitely accurate and true. Next, read the statements following the story. If the statement is definitely true based on the information presented in the story, mark the statement with a "T". If the statement is definitely false based on the information presented, mark the statement with an "F". If the true or false answer cannot be determined based on the information presented, mark the statement with a "?". You may refer back to the story whenever you wish. But you must answer the questions in order, and once answered, you can't go back and make changes.

Stephanie and her friend walked into the music store after lunch. Stephanie wanted to buy the new CD by the group, "No Girls Allowed". There was only one other person in the store when Stephanie and her friend arrived. Stephanie asked, "How much is this CD?" Stephanie's friend said, "Here, let me see it. I don't think he heard you. This tag says it costs $11.99."
True   False   ???                      
1. Stephanie wanted to buy a CD.
2. Stephanie and her friend ate lunch together.
3. Stephanie owns a CD player.
4. There was only one boy in the store.
5. Two girls walked into a music store.
6. There are no boys in the "No Girls Allowed" group.
7. Stephanie and her friend are teenagers.
8. The store's owner didn't hear Stephanie because the music was too loud.
9. Stephanie had enough money to buy the CD.
10. The "No Girls Allowed" CD cost $11.99.
11. The owner of the store is a woman.
12. Stephanie wanted to buy a CD as a gift.
13. One of the CDs costs $11.99.
14. There were two boys in the store.
15. The clerk was hard of hearing.

Pretty easy? Did you notice how you projected information into this simple story which wasn't stated as 'fact'? In every encounter or situation we face, we bring our past experiences to it in the form of unstated, usually unconscious assumptions and premises. We draw inferences based on these assumptions about the situation as if they were fact. Many times we cause problems for ourselves and others when we confuse our inferences with the 'facts', and when we don't recognize our projections as projections.

Return to Tutorial
ThisIsNotThat.com | Steve Stockdale © 2009  | Artwork by Photodisc/Getty Images
.